Wreckage from 1955 crash part of Cold War Memorial




Reported by: Denise Rosch

MOUNT CHARLESTON (KSNV MyNews3.com) – Part of the wreckage of a 1955 plane crash that killed 14 passengers and crew members on a top secret mission during the Cold War is being used as a memorial at the Visitors Center in Kyle Canyon, now under construction.

The plane, which took off from Burbank, Calif., heading to Area 51, ran into bad weather and crashed.

Steve Ririe of the Cold War Memorial Committee says it is high time southern Nevadans got a look at the historic wreckage.

“Most of the debris is still up there,” he said. “It was not removed. We brought the propeller down about 10 years ago, and it's been waiting for this moment today.”

The memorial is surrounded by 14 stones, representing the lives lost in the crash.

Visitors will get to look at the crash site through a telescope at the Visitors Center, which is set to open to the public in May.




Christmas 1955: Trees, telly and toys bring the colour back to Christmas




The 1950s was the decade when television not only changed Christmas Day entertainment, but also the gifts that children asked Santa for.
 
By Jayne Cherrington-Cook 

Rationing ended in 1954, meaning that Christmas 1955 was more abundant than previous years. However, some things were still hard to come by and exotic foods like a banana or coconut made for a great festive treat!

The decorations

After a shortage during World War II, real Christmas trees were once again widely available, and more than 31 million were sold in America for Christmas 1954. However the 1950s also saw the emergence of man-made fibres, such as plastic, which revolutionised the world of Christmas decorations. Artificial trees were bigger than ever before, and Woolworths produced fake trees, made from a new fabric called Nylon, which measured up to eight feet in height.

Candles were still used to decorate the tree, but electric lights were leading the way. A favourite was the bubble light, a candle-shaped light filled with a liquid which would ‘bubble’ and glow.
The entertainment

In previous decades, families huddled around the radio for their Christmas Day entertainment, but television had risen in popularity during the 1950s, and many people bought a TV set to watch the Queen’s Coronation in 1953. While her Christmas speech was first broadcast on TV without pictures in 1955, the new Queen herself didn’t appear on our TVs on Christmas Day until 1957.

The BBC’s monopoly on the airwaves vanished when ITV launched in 1955. On Christmas Day that year, viewers faced a choice between the commercial channel’s flagship Sunday Night at the Palladium, and Bird in Hand, a comedy starring Terry-Thomas, on the BBC.

The first official singles chart began in 1952, and crooner Dickie Valentine hit the Christmas number one spot in 1955 with his festive tune Christmas Alphabet. Another popular party tune was Rock Around the Clock by Bill Hayley and His Comets, which charted in November of that year.


The food
Turkey was still relatively rare on the Christmas table due to its cost, so many families tucked into joints of meat, chicken or duck instead. While home-made Christmas puddings were popular, Mrs Peek was doing a roaring trade in her ready-made puds – a one pound pudding would set you back 2s 6d.

While many of us think nothing of opening a bottle of wine on Christmas Day today, back in 1955 wine was seen as a middle-class drink, and many families would drink beer with their Christmas dinner instead.

The presents

After the scarcity of toys in the war, shops like Woolworths were now doing big business selling a wide variety of toys.
Die-cast toys were really popular during the mid-50s, with Corgi and Matchbox leading the way. They were well-made, but also portable and relatively inexpensive to buy.

The first Airfix aircraft kit was released in 1955. The Spitfire model, which sold for 2s, was the most popular toy in Woolworths that year.

TV also started to influence toys for the first time. Popular gifts in 1955 included a Muffin the Mule puppet and the Sooty Songster Xylophone.

Fashion

After years of drab, recycled and hand-made clothes, the 50s saw the fun return to fashion. A nipped-in waist was the new silhouette along with longer, fuller skirts.


If Christmas Day involved a trip to church or a visit to relatives, then accessories were essential - no well-groomed woman would have been seen without her gloves and good leather handbag!

Rosa Parks ‘Transformed A Nation’ On This Day In 1955


On this day nearly six decades ago, Rosa Parks got on that fateful bus.
She was on her way to a meeting at her local N.A.A.C.P. about protesting segregation laws when it happened: “she found a seat in the first row of the “colored” section in the back. However, after a few stops, the driver ordered her to get up so a white passenger could sit down. Parks refused, and the police were called to take her to jail.”
Her ordeal would soon inspire a citywide boycott and a ruling that such segregation was illegal.
She sat near the middle of the bus, just behind the 10 seats reserved for whites. Soon all of the seats in the bus were filled. When a white man entered the bus, the driver (following the standard practice of segregation) insisted that all four blacks sitting just behind the white section give up their seats so that the man could sit there. Mrs. Parks, who was an active member of the local NAACP, quietly refused to give up her seat.
Her action was spontaneous and not pre-meditated, although, her previous civil rights involvement and strong sense of justice were obvious influences. “When I made that decision,” she said later, “I knew that I had the strength of my ancestors with me.”
She was arrested and convicted of violating the laws of segregation, known as “Jim Crow laws.” Mrs. Parks appealed her conviction and thus formally challenged the legality of segregation.
At the same time, local civil rights activists initiated a boycott of the Montgomery bus system. In cities across the South, segregated bus companies were daily reminders of the inequities of American society. Since African Americans made up about 75 percent of the riders in Montgomery, the boycott posed a serious economic threat to the company and a social threat to white rule in the city.
A group named the Montgomery Improvement Association, composed of local activists and ministers, organized the boycott. As their leader, they chose a young Baptist minister who was new to Montgomery: Martin Luther King, Jr. Sparked by Mrs. Parks’ action, the boycott lasted 381 days, into December 1956 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the segregation law was unconstitutional and the Montgomery buses were integrated. The Montgomery Bus Boycott was the beginning of a revolutionary era of non-violent mass protests in support of civil rights in the United States.
It was not just an accident that the civil rights movement began on a city bus. In a famous 1896 case involving a black man on a train, Plessy v. Ferguson, the U.S. Supreme Court enunciated the “separate but equal” rationale for Jim Crow. Of course, facilities and treatment were never equal.
Under Jim Crow customs and laws, it was relatively easy to separate the races in every area of life except transportation. Bus and train companies couldn’t afford separate cars and so blacks and whites had to occupy the same space.
Thus, transportation was one the most volatile arenas for race relations in the South. Mrs. Parks remembers going to elementary school in Pine Level, Alabama, where buses took white kids to the new school but black kids had to walk to their school.
“I’d see the bus pass every day,” she said. “But to me, that was a way of life; we had no choice but to accept what was the custom. The bus was among the first ways I realized there was a black world and a white world” (emphasis added).
Montgomery’s Jim Crow customs were particularly harsh and gave bus drivers great latitude in making decisions on where people could sit. The law even gave bus drivers the authority to carry guns to enforce their edicts. Mrs. Parks’ attorney Fred Gray remembered, “Virtually every African-American person in Montgomery had some negative experience with the buses. But we had no choice. We had to use the buses for transportation.”
Thus, transportation was one the most volatile arenas for race relations in the South. Mrs. Parks remembers going to elementary school in Pine Level, Alabama, where buses took white kids to the new school but black kids had to walk to their school.
“I’d see the bus pass every day,” she said. “But to me, that was a way of life; we had no choice but to accept what was the custom. The bus was among the first ways I realized there was a black world and a white world”
Montgomery’s Jim Crow customs were particularly harsh and gave bus drivers great latitude in making decisions on where people could sit. The law even gave bus drivers the authority to carry guns to enforce their edicts. Mrs. Parks’ attorney Fred Gray remembered, “Virtually every African-American person in Montgomery had some negative experience with the buses. But we had no choice. We had to use the buses for transportation.”
Civil rights advocates had outlawed Jim Crow in interstate train travel, and blacks in several Southern cities attacked the practice of segregated. There had been a bus boycott in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 1953, but black leaders compromised before making real gains. Joann Robinson, a black university professor and activist in Montgomery, had suggested the idea of a bus boycott months before the Parks arrest.
Two other women had been arrested on buses in Montgomery before Parks and were considered by black leaders as potential clients for challenging the law. However, both were rejected because black leaders felt they would not gain white support. When she heard that the well-respected Rosa Parks had been arrested, one Montgomery African American woman exclaimed, “They’ve messed with the wrong one now.”
In the South, city buses were lightning rods for civil rights activists. It took someone with the courage and character of Rosa Parks to strike with lightning. It required the commitment of the entire African- American community to fan the flames ignited by that lightning into the fires of the civil rights revolution.

-Tamara El (@_SheWise_)

1955 Time Capsule Found As Veterans Memorial Comes Down



COLUMBUS, Ohio - The year was 1955. 10TV was covering stories like the expansion of Port Columbus. Over at the newly formed Veterans Memorial, a time capsule was sealed behind a granite wall.
Now, Vets is being torn down to build a new one. When workers chiseled away a granite wall, they discovered a town capsule.
For a moment, Ronald O'Neal felt a little bit like Indiana Jones.
“It was the hidden treasure. It was exciting,” says O’Neal, Assistant GM at Veterans Memorial.
The treasure was a thin copper box that was sealed with beads of lead, a time capsule. Only the people who had placed it there knew about it.
“It certainly gives us a peek into the history of Columbus back in 1955,” says O’Neal.
It would take some effort to pry it open.
“We had to pry it open with a screwdriver, kind of tap it down very carefully. We spent about an hour and a half getting into to,” added John Raphael, Board of Trustees Chairman.
Inside, they found neatly folded newspapers. It included the three city newspapers of the time – The Columbus Evening Dispatch, Columbus Citizen, and the Ohio State Journal. There was an itemized list of construction costs and the original site plan.
“The biggest attraction was this phone book everybody trying to look up parents and grandparents,” said Raphael.
Finding the time capsule took a little bit of luck. Workers knew it would at the cornerstone of the building and figured it was behind a slab that honored the Board of Trustees. But getting to the time capsule required hammering through a 600 pound of granite.
The time capsule reveals the importance of Vets memorial for its time. For most of six decades it served as THE place where Columbus came to celebrate. All big events were hosted at Vets.
Now, 60 years after its construction, Vets is coming down. The discovery of the time capsule reminds everyone what this building meant to the city.
The items inside the time capsule will be displayed at Motts Military Museum then will be on permanent display at the Ohio historical society.


1955 Flashback: Yankees co-owner hopes to 'some day have outstanding Japanese players' in N.Y.


By Dakota Gardner |

In 1955, following their loss to the Brooklyn Dodgers in the World Series, the Yankees took off on a six-week tour of Japan -- one of the world's then-burgeoning baseball enclaves. The tour included Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford and Mickey Mantle, as well as the team's co-owner Del Webb and MLB Commissioner Ford Frick.
On November 3, the Yankees stopped off in Osaka to play against the All-Stars, a team made up of top players from each of Japan's professional leagues. The Bombers won that game, 7-3, on the back of some solid hitting from Billy Martin, who had a single and a home run.
Webb was heading back to the United States after that game, but before he boarded his plane, he took time to talk to reporters about the trip and the team's newest hire: a Japanese Baseball Hall of Famer named Tadashi Wakabayashi, who'd spent the year serving as a coach in the Japanese Pacific Professional League.
According to Webb, Wakabayashi was hired with the express purpose of integrating Japanese talent into the Yankees' system and, in explaining his reasoning behind the decision, made a pretty prescient comment:
Webb, co-owner of the New York Yankees, expressed hope today that his ball club may some day have outstanding Japanese players on its roster … "The enthusiastic interest shown by the Japanese public in baseball has impressed me with the deep significance of the visit of the New York Yankees in the promotion of Japanese-American friendship."

Of course, the Yankees would eventually sign the dominant slugger Hideki Matsui, and the 2013 Yankees roster included outfielder Ichiro Suzuki, veteran hurler Hiroki Kuroda and superstar pitcher Masahiro Tanaka. We hear those guys are pretty good.